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These are the Best Things to See and Do in London in March

Spring has almost arrived when March rolls on through the ever-brightening streets of London. With the bitterly cold weather far behind us, there’s just chilly weather to deal with this month, and you may even be lucky enough to enjoy the city in the year’s first real rays of sunshine.

Head out to London’s great gardens and parks to enjoy the fresh March air and to see the trees and plants slowly blooming into life and colour again. March is a month of important national days and events in London, and you can enjoy the delights of St Patrick’s Day, Beer Week and famous rowing races. Perhaps more importantly though, it’s International Women’s Day and you can find some fascinating exhibitions being held across the city.

It’s a great month to visit the capital. To help you to plan your trip, here are the best things to see and do in London in March.

St David’s Day

The 1st March is St David’s Day, a celebration of the Welsh patron saint and a celebration of Welsh culture and history. While London doesn’t celebrate quite as intensely as Wales itself, the capital has a huge Welsh population and you will find that the city has some excellent events showcasing the Welsh spirit at the start of the month.

Head to Welsh pubs and restaurants to enjoy a good party or to try some of the national dishes such as Welsh rarebit or Welsh cakes amongst much more. Although St David is by no means as popular as the Irish St Patrick whose saint day is celebrated later in March too, it’s still a wonderful opportunity to indulge in all things Welsh and to learn more about their unique culture.

Orchid Festival at Kew Gardens

The Orchid Festival at Kew Gardens runs into the first two weeks of March, so don’t miss out on visiting this acclaimed celebration of botany and orchids. It’s a guaranteed way to brighten up the start of the month, as Kew Gardens becomes home to thousands of orchids in their annual festival that also highlights the biodiversity of Colombia this year.

Alongside colourful orchids, you can find exhibitions about the South American nation and the importance of their vast and intricate tropical ecosystems to the wider world. There’s even a jaguar, although not a real one.

Kew Gardens

London Beer Week

Another fail-proof method of brightening up your March month will be to attend the acclaimed London Beer Week. That’s right, the city puts on a whole week of events devoted to the celebration of beer and ale.

Pubs and bars across the capital will be offering discounted drinks and new brews to the general public, who have yet another excuse to hit the beer – if they ever needed one before, that is.

Pancake Day

Pancake Day is the peculiar British celebration of pancakes. Okay, so it’s not a celebration of pancakes as such, but rather the day when a lot of pancakes are eaten to mark Shrove Tuesday, which falls on the 5th March in 2019. Traditionally, this day was when all the leftovers in a house were put together and eaten, to clear out the cupboards before Lent and the start of fasting in the run up to Easter.

In Britain, pancakes represent this clearing out of fatty goods, and on Pancake Day it’s a national requirement that you indulge in at least a few of these treats. These days, there are plenty of specialist desert restaurants in the capital to find a great pancake, and even a few dedicated restaurants serving pancakes and pancakes alone, with sweet or savoury fillings to try.

Pancake Day

St Patrick’s Day

The celebration of Ireland’s patron saint is perhaps the most well known and energetically celebrated day of the month. This is a celebration of Irish culture and traditions but with the huge Irish diaspora, it’s spread across the world too. London has a huge Irish community and St Patrick’s Day is most certainly a lively affair in the city.

London hosts a parade on 17th March, and you can expect to be part of a sea of green-flag-wavers enjoying the day. This a celebration that carries on long into the night and it’s a chance to stay out late enjoying more than a few pints of Guinness and celebrating all that it means to be Irish – even if you’re not Irish!

International Women’s Day

Another important day in March is International Women’s Day, which is held across the world on the 8th March each year. This is a wonderful chance to promote equality and to celebrate the work and achievement of women in life and the world.

There are some excellent exhibitions and events taking place across the capital, and March is a month that’s dedicated to women in London.

Women of the World Festival

The Women of the World Festival is one of the best events held in London through March that celebrates women. Found in the Southbank Centre on International Women’s Day and the day after, this festival showcases the work of activists fighting for gender equality. There are talks and discussions with important women working against discrimination, and with political leaders who debate the future landscape of gender equality.

The festival aims to inspire the next generation to strive for equality – be you male or female – and it’s a wonderful way to learn more about what you can do to help.

Mother’s Day

Mother’s Day is another chance to celebrate one of the most important women in most people’s lives: their mother. In 2019, Mother’s Day falls on Sunday 31st March, so you can end the month by treating your mum to a wonderful day out in London.

However you would like to honour or treat her, there are plenty of opportunities in London, from great restaurants and cafes to theatrical performances, visit to parks or museums and much, much more. The opportunities are quite literally endless on Mother’s Day in London.

Richmond Park

Richmond Park can be a fantastic place to visit any time of the year, but call into this vast outdoor space on London’s doorstep in March to experience the famous park as it transitions from winter to spring. It might be a bit chilly still, but you can enjoy the fresh air while walking around the many paths that lead you through this historic royal park.

Stroll through the wide fields on the lookout for the many deer that will begin to emerge into the ever-brightening sunshine after the cold of winter. Watch as the leaves slowly regain their strength and vibrant colour as things warm up, and spring waits to burst forth again.

Richmond Park

Kensington Gardens

Kensington Gardens, another royal park, is a wonderful place to experience the transition from winter to spring in the heart of the city. The gardens are located very centrally, as they were once the private gardens of the royal family who live at Kensington Palace next to Hyde Park.

Kensington Gardens form a beautiful escape from the crowded streets of the capital. In March, you can enjoy the blooming colour of the plants and flowers as they burst into life throughout the month.

Hampton Court Palace

Hampton Court Palace is the old residence of the monarchy, including the infamous Henry VIII. Found in the London suburbs at Richmond-upon-Thames, the palace dates back to the 16th century and was used extensively by royalty through to the Georgian era.

Today, the grand halls and elegant bedrooms are wonderful to explore, and at Hampton Court Palace you can learn much about the opulent lives lived by the royalty in past centuries.

The palace is also home to extensive grounds and, with the warmer air, you can enjoy them in comfort as March progresses. Explore the vast outdoor maze – try not to get lost! – and experience the colourful winter-to-spring transitions of the varied flora found around Hampton Court.

Hampton Court Palace

Bedrooms of London

In stark contrast to the lavishness of the royal family, past and present, and the grandness of the royal palaces are the day-to-day lives of many of London’s poorer families. A new exhibition though is attempting to highlight the poor living conditions of many of these families, particularly the children, and it’s an opportunity to learn more about an often forgotten aspect of life in modern London.

The Bedrooms of London exhibition is found at the Foundling Museum, a museum that focuses on children through British history, and this extraordinary photographic display shows the worst living conditions of children and families across the capital with an intimate look inside different bedrooms. It’s a moving look at the struggles faced by low-income families in a city that on the outset seems to be vastly wealthy.

Chelsea Antiques Fair

A unique event held in Chelsea every March is the Antiques Fair. This traditional fair gives you the opportunity to browse through historic offerings that are for sale, and to learn a little bit about the country’s and the capital’s history through the items and their sellers.

Browse through dusty and historic artefacts, get nostalgic and have a great time at this unusual and often eccentric March event.

Six Nations Rugby Final Games

The Six Nations is Europe’s best rugby tournament, as the national teams of England, Scotland, Wales, Ireland, France and Italy compete against each other for the championship every year. It’s an incredibly popular event, and from February through to March when fixtures are held across the continent, you can join Rugby fans pouring into pubs, bars and stadiums to cheer their teams on.

March is when the tournament really picks up, as the last few games are played. Watch the final deciders with the crowds in London cheering on England or their respective national teams, or perhaps if you are lucky you can even find an elusive ticket to a game at Twickenham Stadium.

Head of the River Race

Every March, one of the most iconic rowing races in the country is held in London. The Head of the River Race is a 4-mile long course that takes rowing teams along the wide River Thames from Mortlake to Putney. Over several days, different teams compete in different categories for the prestigious prizes in this professional race.

Alongside the racing, you can find the banks of the river lined with cheering spectators in a lively and loud atmosphere, making this a wonderful sporting event to turn out for. The course is actually the same as the perhaps more famous Oxford and Cambridge Boat Race, but the Head of the River is held in the opposite direction and is played out by more rowing teams. This is a timed event and teams leave independently of each other, at different intervals. It’s simple; whoever completes the course fastest is the winner.

River Thames

London Landmarks Half Marathon

This fantastic running event sees racers competing over a half marathon course that winds its way through central London’s most iconic sights and attractions. It’s a wonderfully picturesque running event and helps to highlight the city’s best landmarks to the crowds who turn out to watch the racers and cheer them on, whilst having the chance to explore London.

Of course, the race is open to the public, and it’s a great race to be part of if you can secure a spot in this most popular of events.

Where’s Wally? Fun Run

A much less professional race to be part of, and a race focused more on fun and raising money for charity, is the Where’s Wally? Fun Run. This magnificent running event takes place in March over 5 and 10-kilometre courses, which take runners through Clapham Common. If you’re taking part, dress up as Where’s Wally? If you’re spectating, why not dress up too? Or just watch a mass of Where’s Wally? runners fighting their way around the course in full costume.

To find out more about the exciting things to do in London during March or to book one of our exciting London tours, contact Premium Tours today.

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